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Mixed-use developments and affordable housing
#16
(04-13-2018, 07:16 AM)panamaniac Wrote:
(04-13-2018, 02:19 AM)jeffster Wrote: The real issue of affordable housing is that who would ever build such a thing? I don't think there is money to be made in that sector. Not to mention that affordable housing isn't always treated nicely by their tenants.

If it really means that much to them, then it would have be the region/city building it.  Or a greatly reduced tax (mill) rate on such units.

When a municipality requires a developer to incorporate affordable housing into projects (not a bad idea, imo), isn't the municipality expected to "make the developer whole" through some sort of subsidy?  I don't think the developer is expected not to be fully compensated for the construction of affordable housing.

A municipality can require a portion to be "affordable" (however that is defined) using zoning bylaws. Or by providing bonusing etc in exchange for some portion of affordable housing.
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#17
To what extent does increasing the supply of housing overall (especially at the high end) increase the supply of affordable housing? Does making new condos provide any easing of housing costs elsewhere?

Even if the answer to any of that is yes I'd love to see more explicitly affordable housing projects, so the question is not leading to anything, I'm just pretty ignorant on the matter. I found an opinion piece published on the Fraser Institute that suggests it does (https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article/...ase-supply) but I am skeptical of the Fraser Institute (our politics are not in alignment, typically) and there isn't really anything resembling sources in that particular article.
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#18
(04-13-2018, 02:09 PM)robdrimmie Wrote: To what extent does increasing the supply of housing overall (especially at the high end) increase the supply of affordable housing? Does making new condos provide any easing of housing costs elsewhere?

Even if the answer to any of that is yes I'd love to see more explicitly affordable housing projects, so the question is not leading to anything, I'm just pretty ignorant on the matter. I found an opinion piece published on the Fraser Institute that suggests it does (https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article/...ase-supply) but I am skeptical of the Fraser Institute (our politics are not in alignment, typically) and there isn't really anything resembling sources in that particular article.

The FI is not the most reliable sources, I find it's article's rather biased.

That being said, I think more housing is always important.  If a city is growing like Kitchener (and Waterloo) is (are), then people are moving here.  Not building housing means those wealthy people who are moving here will simply displace the poorer current residents.  Building housing helps reduce that problem.

The biggest argument for including affordable housing in new developments for me, is that I think it is better (for both the wealthy, and the poorer residents) to be exposed to a diverse group of people.  It is not good for anyone to live in an enclave of one's "own kind".
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#19
If you follow council, they definitely can make affordable housing part of their requirements for bonusing. But if you follow council, you will see that the greater importance is on shadow impacts, potential wind impacts, heritage styling, excessive parking and auto-oriented design. It's like the saying "a council's vision isn't in it's mission statement, it's in its budget," and councils have repeatedly shown that words about affordable housing are hollow, but focus on style and lowering density are very real.
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#20
(04-17-2018, 08:56 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: If you follow council, they definitely can make affordable housing part of their requirements for bonusing. But if you follow council, you will see that the greater importance is on shadow impacts, potential wind impacts, heritage styling, excessive parking and auto-oriented design. It's like the saying "a council's vision isn't in it's mission statement, it's in its budget," and councils have repeatedly shown that words about affordable housing are hollow, but focus on style and lowering density are very real.

Thoughts of the next election tend to always be in the councillors' minds, hence the concerns about shadow impacts, reduced density etc.
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#21
That's what I mean, that's all they ever push for. Quick, name the last time a development was approved after adding affordable housing to itself to gain density bonusing. I can't think of one this millenium.
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