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Kitchener Ward 9 candidates
#1
Here is some information about the (downtown) Ward 9 candidates, for those of you either living in DTK or just interested in the outcome.

Debbie Chapman
https://www.debbiechapman.ca/
  • PoliSci professor at WLU
  • Famously lost by a single vote to Frank Etherington in 2010
  • Did not run in 2014
  • Former president of Cherry Park neighbourhood association
  • Priorities: Responsible Development, Integrated Transportation Infrastructure, Better integration of transportation infrastructure, Meaningful Community Engagement, Affordable Housing, Environmental Sustainability, Effective Participatory Budgeting, Making Community Space, Arts and Culture Funding
Quotes:
Quote:I would like to see Responsible development for all proposed projects in Ward 9 and surrounding areas. By responsible, I mean that residents in established neighbourhoods must be at the table as decisions are being made, the streetscape must mirror or at least be compatible with the existing neighbourhood, and set-backs and transitions should follow strict guidelines.

Quote:Would it be unreasonable to ask that development slow down, that the finalization of the new land use planning regime be expedited - that is, be passed, approved and implemented now and not at the end of the year or some time next year, and that City Council ensure responsible development so that people don’t look back in 30 years and say “what were they thinking”? It is not about a fear of change. It’s about our collective responsibility to ensure that neighbourhoods are not negatively impacted, that concerned citizens are brought to the table with developers, planners and councillors as decisions are being made, and not just pacified through information sessions where people often feel that their comments go unnoticed, and finally that the vision of the city we have is reflected in the bylaws that we draft.

Melissa Bowman
http://www.melissabowmanward9.ca/
  • Current president of Victoria Park neighbourhood association
  • Kitchener Community Builder award
  • Would have supported sidewalk clearing study
Quotes:
Quote:It is exciting to see Kitchener willing to utilize innovative processes such as participatory budgeting. I believe participatory budgeting helps create the type of city I want to see, one that is inclusive, engaged, and supported. By offering a variety of ways for citizen involvement in this budget allocation process, the city hears and includes a wider variety of voices and opinions. Engaged neighbours provide input, feedback, and vote on next steps. The city supports residents by funding the new park improvements.

Quote:Urbanist Jane Jacobs stated, “The point of cities is multiplicity of choice.” An inclusive, engaged and supported city provides a variety of transportation choices. Whether you cycle, use transit, walk, or drive, good urban design must include quality options for all.

Tia Rebecca Driver
https://driverward9.ca/
  • Master of Environmental Studies student at UW
  • Governor and student senator at UW
  • Would have supported sidewalk clearing study
Quotes:
Quote:To start, the word injection overshadows all of the other benefits these sites offer or could offer. As it stands, I don’t feel there has been enough community engagement, or communication regarding the potential locations for these sites. There are still many questions regarding spin-off effects and no comprehensive answers. Nevertheless, SIS are important for our community’s health and wellbeing.

Quote:I feel that we do need to develop the core, however I have concerns with the lack of affordable housing, gentrifications and protection of historical buildings. We lost the Mayfair Hotel due to decay, and it would be a shame if we lose more of our historical core. Furthermore, design guidelines should start to promote set-backs and value sunshine. I’m afraid downtown Kitchener will end-up looking like King St. N in Waterloo, between University and Columbia. We can develop, but it must be done smartly.


Philip Molto and Steve Strohack have not posted any information yet.
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#2
Anyone else frustrated with all the focus on King St. N between Uni and Columbia. Most people who dislike development seem to put to that area but there are some nice sections behind some of those buildings. It's not perfect but there are far worse examples of student-ification that I have seen.
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#3
(08-15-2018, 06:28 PM)welltoldtales Wrote: Anyone else frustrated with all the focus on King St. N between Uni and Columbia. Most people who dislike development seem to put to that area but there are some nice sections behind some of those buildings. It's not perfect but there are far worse examples of student-ification that I have seen.

Not to mention that Kitchener zoning wouldn't allow that anyway ...
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#4
Steve Strohack has dropped out of the race. At this point Melissa Bowman and Debbie Chapman appear to be the front-runners.
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#5
(09-28-2018, 04:45 PM)tomh009 Wrote: Steve Strohack has dropped out of the race. At this point Melissa Bowman and Debbie Chapman appear to be the front-runners.

Seems like they both have very similar platforms too, at least from my cursory glance at things.
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#6
As a former ward 9 resident, I'm watching this one closely.

Any predictions?
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#7
(09-28-2018, 05:16 PM)clasher Wrote:
(09-28-2018, 04:45 PM)tomh009 Wrote: Steve Strohack has dropped out of the race. At this point Melissa Bowman and Debbie Chapman appear to be the front-runners.

Seems like they both have very similar platforms too, at least from my cursory glance at things.

Similar … but Chapman clearly prefers heritage to development, whereas Bowman agrees that we also need development (and housing, specifically), we cannot preserve everything that's old. 

So that definitely tells me who I want to vote for.
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#8
Oh that definitely sells it for me too. But alas, not a voter there. Rats
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#9
(09-28-2018, 09:56 PM)Spokes Wrote: Oh that definitely sells it for me too.  But alas, not a voter there.  Rats

Tell your friends to vote! Smile
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#10
Could be another close one like Etherington vs. Chapman in 2010.

Looking around the ward it appears Chapman has the lead in signs, but Bowman seems to be doing a better presence on the web - but that is also probably biased by the feeds I see.

My gut tells me that people who have lawn signs are probably older and therefore more likely to vote, so Chapman may take it based on that.

I've seen Bowman out doing tonnes of door knocking and community events, but I am sure Chapman is out doing the same just our paths/schedules just haven't crossed as much.

Having talked with both it seems that Bowman has a better grasp on cycling issues, but Chapman has been working hard getting up to speed and adopting a lot of CycleWR talking points.

Personally I am pulling for Bowman. She seems to have the youthful, optimistic, energy with a healthy mix of perspective and consensus building that our council needs.

At the doorstep Chapman came across as bit desperate, agreeing to anything I was asking her about (not really having an opinion of her own) and really just going through the motions.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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#11
I can see why people would be interested in Bowman and Chapman. But, what about the other two (Molto and Driver)? I've been to a couple of the public debates and the other two seem to be clued into the community as well.
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#12
Molto is a long-time resident, worked in local TV media for years, but drops a lot of heritage/NIMBYism hints to my ears. Driver is a former student leader, many environmental accolades, but it's a crowded field for the youngest candidate to win. I expect a lot of people to unfortunately vote for the lone remaining male candidate, and then one of Chapman or Bowman will also rank high when the ballots are all cast.
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#13
I don't think I have seen a single sign for Molto or Driver yet. Strohack had some signs but 90% of them are for Bowman or Chapman.
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#14
Driver also turned me off when she insisted that Victoria Park was overrun with needles and everyone knew this.

I fully understand we have serious social problems in the region, resulting in drug use, but I live downtown, am rather observant, and yet have never once seen a needle in the park.

So I find her position (along with those of others) a gross overstatement.

As for Molto, he's made his position on sidewalk clearing quite clear: https://twitter.com/PhilipMolto/status/1...6300114956 I certainly wouldn't vote for someone with such a ridiculous suggestion about how to solve a real problem in our city.
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#15
(10-02-2018, 10:51 AM)tomh009 Wrote: I don't think I have seen a single sign for Molto or Driver yet. Strohack had some signs but 90% of them are for Bowman or Chapman.

There are a few downtown (I saw specifically on Joseph), but I haven't seen any on private property.

Strohack has dropped out of course, and without endorsing another candidate, I do wonder why.
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