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Grand River Transit
#31
(11-04-2014, 12:34 PM)Markster Wrote: What I imagine we're seeing here is that yes, the towers of King St are making significant changes to travel patterns. My guess is that students are still gravitating to the most reliable service, the iXpress, but inbound in the morning, they wait at the iXpress stop and take whichever bus comes first.  In the evening, they all go to the iXpress stop, crush load it (because there fewer alternate services at DC) and then all pile out at Laurier to go home to the towers.

The service will not be popular. But it will provide some basic service to a part of the city that's been isolated from transit.

I agree that the towers had reduced the length of the trips, thus the emptier buses in Charles St. terminal, however it still would make much less of a difference in terms of number of passengers carried. Anyone attending UW and living on King is likely to take the bus to school.

Route 15 is an example of an area built for cars, and it is simply not dense enough to justify regular bus service.
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#32
(11-04-2014, 01:03 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: I agree that the towers had reduced the length of the trips, thus the emptier buses in Charles St. terminal, however it still would make much less of a difference in terms of number of passengers carried. Anyone attending UW and living on King is likely to take the bus to school.

Aha, but there are people who live in the towers that don't go to UW. They go to Laurier. And my anecdotal view is that it's the Laurier students who have been more likely to live Downtown. All of those Laurier students are no longer taking a bus twice a day. Also, there have been towers opening up adjacent to UW as well.
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#33
(11-04-2014, 01:03 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: Route 15 is an example of an area built for cars, and it is simply not dense enough to justify regular bus service.

Dead right. And I would say that those buses should be allocated to a part of the region where they will serve actual riders, and serve to attract more of them.
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#34
(11-04-2014, 09:52 AM)BuildingScout Wrote:
(11-04-2014, 02:01 AM)mpd618 Wrote: With the university district housing developments, I suspect there's some reverse trends for student ridership that might counterbalance student population increases.

I wouldn't put too much stock in the figure, though.

I actually noticed that students tend to ride the 92 or any of the uni buses now that they are very frequent, rather than walking home as one was forced to do back in the day of buses that went by every 40 minutes off-peak and stopped in every corner, even to Northdale/Columbia.

Speaking of the 92 I didn't see that in the posted materials, especially related to the changes to the 7. Is this seasonal experiment over? Will it continue as is, or become a full year route?
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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#35
(11-04-2014, 09:52 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: Speaking of the 92 I didn't see that in the posted materials, especially related to the changes to the 7. Is this seasonal experiment over? Will it continue as is, or become a full year route?

That's a good question to ask at the consultations.
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#36
The 92 has graduated into a regular service.
You can pick up a paper schedule for it; it says "year round schedule" just like any other bus. The pilot period was last spring, and the fact that it came back at all this fall says everything.
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#37
(11-05-2014, 11:38 AM)Markster Wrote: The 92 has graduated into a regular service.
You can pick up a paper schedule for it; it says "year round schedule" just like any other bus.  The pilot period was last spring, and the fact that it came back at all this fall says everything.

Thanks! I hadn't caught that - assumed that it came back, but as a Fall/Winter only service.
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#38
I've been looking through the old GRT bus schedules and came across the 2006 iXpress one (can be found here). I just find it interesting how far we've come in the past few years... midday service was every 30 minutes :o Today it's every 10 minutes and even then there's no room on the bus sometimes. The next few years will be even more exciting for GRT as the ION gets going.
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#39
I remember riding it around that time and thought it to be a really neat option, after only being used to the 7 or 8 on their 30 minute schedules to get anywhere, or 8's 45 / 60 minute schedule on weekends. Here's hoping things keep improving.
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#40
The main thing I remember about the iXpress in 2006 was that I was pissed that it didn't start the previous year, when I lived just south of King/Union.
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