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Grand River Transit
#41
(11-09-2014, 10:07 PM)Waterlooer Wrote: I've been looking through the old GRT bus schedules and came across the 2006 iXpress one (can be found here). I just find it interesting how far we've come in the past few years... midday service was every 30 minutes :o Today it's every 10 minutes and even then there's no room on the bus sometimes. The next few years will be even more exciting for GRT as the ION gets going.

Those 30 minutes were an improvement. I recall that if back in the day a long time ago if I missed the non-rush hour number 7 bus to university the next one was 40 or 50 minutes out (there were other #7s in between, but not to University). The end result is that I almost always walked to school which took about 25 minutes.
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#42
(11-09-2014, 10:07 PM)Waterlooer Wrote: I've been looking through the old GRT bus schedules...

I think it would be neat to see where some of the former local transit routes went.  As the urban fabric evolved (housing, offices, commercial, factories built or torn down), how did service change? If you look carefully around town, you can sometimes see an abandoned concrete or asphalt pad where a bus stop used to be.

Does anyone have a feel for how transit (trolley and bus) evolved? What was the peak density of coverage?  I would be interested to see how GRT's goal of getting every resident within X00m of a transit stop compares to historical service levels.

Are there any history-minded, transit advocates who are handy with mapping tools who would be interested?
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#43
(11-10-2014, 12:07 PM)nms Wrote:
(11-09-2014, 10:07 PM)Waterlooer Wrote: I've been looking through the old GRT bus schedules...

I think it would be neat to see where some of the former local transit routes went.  As the urban fabric evolved (housing, offices, commercial, factories built or torn down), how did service change? If you look carefully around town, you can sometimes see an abandoned concrete or asphalt pad where a bus stop used to be.

Does anyone have a feel for how transit (trolley and bus) evolved? What was the peak density of coverage?  I would be interested to see how GRT's goal of getting every resident within X00m of a transit stop compares to historical service levels.

Are there any history-minded, transit advocates who are handy with mapping tools who would be interested?

I don't got that for GRT, but I have encountered this for Montreal:

http://www.cat-bus.com/2013/03/explore-t...ars-apart/

He also has walksheds for Montreal compared with transit stops:

http://www.cat-bus.com/2013/04/walksheds...-stations/

One thing I've noticed is that in Montreal, there are still bus lines running which used to be trolley lines 100 years ago, or buses that are still buses 100 years later (for instance, the 85 near my parents' house).

I'm sure that if we threw a couple thousand dollars and source info at Anton, we could get him to do something like that for GRT (or if we somehow otherwise interested him; but he lives in Montreal, not KW, so it might be less interesting for him).
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#44
Ontario’s Grand River Valley Electric Railways by John Mills has a chapter about the history of the Belin & Waterloo Street Railway, a precursor to the system that eventually became the trolley buses and Kitchener Transit. There are maps showing the extent of the streetcar lines running from what is now Rockway Seniors Centre on King in Kitchener to uptown Waterloo. There's another line running out to Bridgeport that was apparently converted to buses in 1940. The rest of the streetcar line was switched to trolley buses after the war and they extended that service to King & University it looks like. The book is on file at the KPL
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#45
I think I recall reading once that you could take the streetcar to the Rockway terminal and from there catch a train that could take you all the way to Port Dover.
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#46
Yep, there was also a station on Queen Street for that railway, the Grand River Railway. It was owned by CP and they also owned the Lake Erie & Northern and ran them as one company. The book says they stopped passenger service in 1955... the Iron Horse trail is the old GRR right of way.
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#47
(11-10-2014, 12:07 PM)nms Wrote: Does anyone have a feel for how transit (trolley and bus) evolved? What was the peak density of coverage?  I would be interested to see how GRT's goal of getting every resident within X00m of a transit stop compares to historical service levels.

I think the hard part is getting the data in more than an anecdotal way. I've seen a number of histories of the streetcar system, but not much about buses beyond this overview of the various agencies and companies that ran it. Maybe a good question for the local municipal archives departments.
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#48
Traction on the Grand by John Mills is a pretty good resource. It covers all the electric railways in Waterloo and Brantford. It was recently updated and reprinted with colour photos.
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#49
I am looking for information about how GRT is funded, and I am having trouble finding/understanding it. From the business plan document published online (http://www.grt.ca/en/aboutus/grtbusinessplan.asp) it sounds as if the primary sources of funding are property taxes and fare recoveries, and that in 2010 the cost recovery ratio was 37% (which is already confusing, because that is a percentage and not a ratio). I guess I am supposed to conclude that the remaining 63% of funding came from property taxes, but then I see this asterisk:


*Net cost of service is comprised of municipal contribution towards operating costs and debt service, from property taxes, plus provincial contribution.

so now I am confused. There is some mention on page 43 of the linked PDF that the provincial share comes from gas tax funding, but I do not know the breakdown. The PDF mentions a "Working Paper 9: Financial Plan" but I have not been able to find that online.

How is GRT funded?
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#50
(11-11-2014, 08:57 PM)fakepnijjar Wrote: How is GRT funded?

Operations are funded from property taxes, fares / passes / U-pass contracts, provincial gas tax funding, and ads. You can find more information in the 2014 Region of Waterloo budget book, starting with page 177. Capital costs are from property taxes and development charges, and (I believe) some project-specific upper level contributions.
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