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Aiming for Bare Minimum: Why Cycletrack Networks Are the Only Way Forward
#11
(10-07-2018, 09:54 AM)Canard Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 09:50 AM)clasher Wrote: On to another bike route.

...and where does that bike route end?

I guess all I'm getting at is everything has to end, somewhere, unless it is a loop.

Onto traffic calmed quite residential streets, plaza parking lots, parks, schools.

Basically the minimum cycling grid should more or less be a map of the arterial and large connector roads in the city.

That's of course my interpretation only.
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#12
The ends of a major route should at least give multiple minor routes to take from there. These should be clearly signposted and indicate what sort of route they are (painted lane, quiet street).
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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#13
(10-03-2018, 12:12 PM)jamincan Wrote: This is completely spot on. All of the nicest cycling infrastructure doesn't accomplish anything if you can't reach it, or if it doesn't go anywhere.

Right. This is why I can't really get excited about a road diet for Road X or Avenue Y or Street Z, if we're just doing a 3-4 block stretch with nice cycling infrastructure -- but it doesn't connect with anything else. Unless people are just going to cycle back and forth on one street, what we need is connectivity so that you can use your bicycle to get from A to B.
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#14
There are loads of examples of short-comings that could be easily fixed that I know of personally. Others probably know of loads of others. Here are some examples:

The Henry Strum Greenway from Victoria Park to Ira Needles is an awesome bike route. There are some improvements that could be made, but on the whole, it's awesome. It ends right at Ira Needles just opposite Glasgow. A bit further along Glasgow is an awesome mountain biking park, the Hydrocut. They really should have a bike refuge-type thing in the boulevard to make it easier for cyclists to cross there, but they don't, and it makes it more awkward and dangerous.

On Thursday I bike down to Mclennan Park. I take the Stanley Park greenway trail down to Weber, and them forced to take an uncomfortable detour on Weber/Dixon to Eckert. No bike lanes or infrastructure to that point, but then nice big bike lanes on Eckert, just emerging from nowhere. I then take a great trail through Wilson Park and then have to make my own way across to Homer Watson. There's a great trailway going west to Fischer-Hallman, but it stops just short of Homer Watson.

Taking the Spur Line to the Laurel Trail through uptown is a mess. I haven't a clue where cyclists are supposed to go once they cross King Street.
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#15
(10-07-2018, 03:26 PM)jamincan Wrote: There are loads of examples of short-comings that could be easily fixed that I know of personally. Others probably know of loads of others.
Mike Boos was collecting examples on behalf of CycleWR and working on a minimum grid proposal for the Region. He'd probably like to hear your examples. It's actually hard to know where the network falls down without personal experience.
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#16
(10-07-2018, 10:27 AM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 09:54 AM)Canard Wrote: ...and where does that bike route end?

I guess all I'm getting at is everything has to end, somewhere, unless it is a loop.

Onto traffic calmed quite residential streets, plaza parking lots, parks, schools.

...which is literally exactly what happens to the IHT at Borden or Park, or the Spur Line Trail at Aherns/Breihthaupt.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#17
Oh yeah, one of the most obvious examples I'm talking about and glaring holes is on the very trail I mentioned earlier where it goes through Lynnvalley Park. The trail on the south side continues all the way to the IHT and Victoria Park. The trail on the north side is a key connector to areas north of the railway tracks. There is a desire path through the field, but no official trail. I'd wager 90% of people traveling through the park use that desire path, though.
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#18
FWIW, I've been working on this map of major trunk trail routes (in my opinion anyway), and marking significant missing connections or barriers. I've mainly worked on the west-end of Kitchener, but already you can clearly see where there are some significant holes and how investment in some key areas would greatly improve the connectivity of the whole trail network. Importantly, the entire area south of the expressway and west of the rail lands/Courtland is pretty effectively cut-off from the rest of KW right now.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sbARRO...sp=sharing
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#19
(10-07-2018, 09:13 PM)jamincan Wrote: FWIW, I've been working on this map of major trunk trail routes (in my opinion anyway), and marking significant missing connections or barriers. I've mainly worked on the west-end of Kitchener, but already you can clearly see where there are some significant holes and how investment in some key areas would greatly improve the connectivity of the whole trail network. Importantly, the entire area south of the expressway and west of the rail lands/Courtland is pretty effectively cut-off from the rest of KW right now.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sbARRO...sp=sharing

Wow. You have already likely done more work than the city employees have !!!
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#20
(10-07-2018, 09:13 PM)jamincan Wrote: FWIW, I've been working on this map of major trunk trail routes (in my opinion anyway), and marking significant missing connections or barriers. I've mainly worked on the west-end of Kitchener, but already you can clearly see where there are some significant holes and how investment in some key areas would greatly improve the connectivity of the whole trail network. Importantly, the entire area south of the expressway and west of the rail lands/Courtland is pretty effectively cut-off from the rest of KW right now.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sbARRO...sp=sharing

Thank you, that's awesome!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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