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WRDSB
#1
WRDSB
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#2
Quote:Public school trustee Kathi Smith believes it would help to teach some children year-round, rather than have them take two months off in the summer.

This would help students forget less, and it would help kids whose families can't afford tutors, school camps and learning materials.

But the school board rejected her proposal to test year-round schooling at two elementary schools. In January, it handed her idea to an advisory committee that came to no conclusion and now proposes to spend $35,000 researching impacts.


On the heels of the WRDSB saying that it would cost $40 million to put air conditioning in all schools that don't have it, this is a non starter IMO
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#3
My understanding of the research is that it is positive in favour of year-round schooling, but this is a challenging area in which to draw research conclusions. Ultimately it is a political decision, as mentioned in the story.
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#4
Oh there's lots of evidence that full year schooling is beneficial. Summer break seems like a bit of a memory eraser for a lot of students.

Plus many parents then have to find childcare.

Personally I'm against it though.
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#5
Why are you against it?
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#6
I can't see a solitary school board going ahead with this - we'd need policy change on probably the provincial level.

And given the state of many schools in this province, they'd need a lot of work to be able to operate year-round.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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#7
One example of a downstream impact: Camps would need to rework their business model. Students who rely on these camps for income and skills would need to look elsewhere for employment.
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#8
(11-20-2018, 12:03 PM)KevinL Wrote: I can't see a solitary school board going ahead with this - we'd need policy change on probably the provincial level.

And given the state of many schools in this province, they'd need a lot of work to be able to operate year-round.

The Record article seemed to suggest that some school boards in Ontario were doing it already?
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#9
From what little I've read about all-year school is that there are still a few weeks off here and there, so camps and summer holidays wouldn't be completely gone. I imagine there would be more long weekends and such too, they wouldn't massively increase the number of school days; just spread them out a bit more throughout the year. Sucks for teachers I guess.
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#10
(11-20-2018, 12:47 PM)clasher Wrote: From what little I've read about all-year school is that there are still a few weeks off here and there, so camps and summer holidays wouldn't be completely gone. I imagine there would be more long weekends and such too, they wouldn't massively increase the number of school days; just spread them out a bit more throughout the year. Sucks for teachers I guess.

The number of school days would stay the same, afaik.
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#11
(11-20-2018, 11:45 AM)MidTowner Wrote: Why are you against it?


Much of why I agree with it is just my personal preference as a teacher.  I would much rather have time off in the summer than more time off in the fall or winter.  So my biggest feelings against it have nothing to do with education and just preference.

I do know though that as it gets hot in May and June it is extremely difficult for students.  So few high schools have AC right now.  $40 million to install it is a lot of money, and without it, it can't happen.  Also, I know a TON of students who rely on the summer for jobs, and so that would be impacted.

I actually agree with it in a lot of ways from an education standpoint.
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#12
(11-20-2018, 12:03 PM)KevinL Wrote: I can't see a solitary school board going ahead with this - we'd need policy change on probably the provincial level.

And given the state of many schools in this province, they'd need a lot of work to be able to operate year-round.

There are schools in Toronto doing it as a pilot project.
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#13
(11-20-2018, 12:47 PM)clasher Wrote: From what little I've read about all-year school is that there are still a few weeks off here and there, so camps and summer holidays wouldn't be completely gone. I imagine there would be more long weekends and such too, they wouldn't massively increase the number of school days; just spread them out a bit more throughout the year. Sucks for teachers I guess.

The number of school days stays the same.

You'd get a 3rd week at Winter Break.  A week in the fall.  A second week in March.  Off the top of my head
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#14
(11-20-2018, 10:22 AM)Spokes Wrote:
Quote:Public school trustee Kathi Smith believes it would help to teach some children year-round, rather than have them take two months off in the summer.

This would help students forget less, and it would help kids whose families can't afford tutors, school camps and learning materials.

But the school board rejected her proposal to test year-round schooling at two elementary schools. In January, it handed her idea to an advisory committee that came to no conclusion and now proposes to spend $35,000 researching impacts.


On the heels of the WRDSB saying that it would cost $40 million to put air conditioning in all schools that don't have it, this is a non starter IMO

I think it would have been a terrific idea with one exception -- summer jobs. Many businesses (and local governments) depend on hires for summer, and it's a great learning experience. However, I think for JK-8 it would be really beneficial.

I dug around a bit because I was curious to see how the holidays worked, so rather than their 9 to 10 weeks off at summer, they had a schedule like this:

End of July, first day of school.
First two weeks in October, a 2 week fall break (includes Thanksgiving Day).
Christmas break is 3 weeks long, rather than 2 weeks.
Mid-winter break in February, for 1 week.
Spring break in March is 2 weeks, rather than 1 week.
School ends at the end of June, for a 5 week break (includes Canada Day).

If I was a kid, I think I would like the multiple short (but long) breaks. I'd gladly give up that 2 month summer break if it meant a break in October, February and extra time at Christmas and March Break. Though one change I'd do, is keep Christmas break to two weeks and add a 1 week vacation in May, during Victoria Day. I say this is because the time between the March Break and "summer" break is about 3 1/2 months, while typically all the other breaks are between 1 and 2 months apart.

Doesn't matter though, it's moot, as the region said "no".
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#15
(11-20-2018, 05:43 PM)jeffster Wrote:
(11-20-2018, 10:22 AM)Spokes Wrote:

On the heels of the WRDSB saying that it would cost $40 million to put air conditioning in all schools that don't have it, this is a non starter IMO

I think it would have been a terrific idea with one exception -- summer jobs. Many businesses (and local governments) depend on hires for summer, and it's a great learning experience.  However, I think for JK-8 it would be really beneficial.

I dug around a bit because I was curious to see how the holidays worked, so rather than their 9 to 10 weeks off at summer, they had a schedule like this:

End of July, first day of school.
First two weeks in October, a 2 week fall break (includes Thanksgiving Day).
Christmas break is 3 weeks long, rather than 2 weeks.
Mid-winter break in February, for 1 week.
Spring break in March is 2 weeks, rather than 1 week.
School ends at the end of June, for a 5 week break (includes Canada Day).

If I was a kid, I think I would like the multiple short (but long) breaks. I'd gladly give up that 2 month summer break if it meant a break in October, February and extra time at Christmas and March Break. Though one change I'd do, is keep Christmas break to two weeks and add a 1 week vacation in May, during Victoria Day. I say this is because the time between the March Break and "summer" break is about 3 1/2 months, while typically all the other breaks are between 1 and 2 months apart.

Doesn't matter though, it's moot, as the region said "no".

I like the year breaks and  modified with your suggested change:

"Second Monday in August, first day of school year.
First two weeks in October, a 2 week fall break (includes Thanksgiving Day).
Christmas break is 2 weeks.
Mid-winter break in February, for 1 week.
Spring break in March is 2 weeks, rather than 1 week.
May with the week before Victoria Day weekend 
School ends at the end of June, for a 5 week break (includes Canada Day)."
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