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ION - Waterloo Region's Light Rail Transit
(08-30-2015, 09:00 PM)mpd618 Wrote:
(08-30-2015, 06:33 PM)GtwoK Wrote: From here, the track would split: ...

Not passing judgement on the rest of it, but on this? Please, no. A one-way transit stop is one of the worst things. It's bad enough when the two directions are separated by a relatively short distance, but it's not really workable to have a rapid transit stop that lets you go in only one direction and have no way of getting back.

Alright, point taken. I had assumed that since it was done at a few points in phase 1 that it was a relatively normal thing to have, though I understand the qualms.

(08-30-2015, 11:14 PM)KevinL Wrote:
(08-30-2015, 06:33 PM)GtwoK Wrote: Now, Phase 3? I don't to clog the forum with a giant list of stops, but I will be very upset if it doesn't start at the Sunrise Center, travel down Ottawa to Homer Watson (could easily branch off to the Ottawa / Mill stop from here... not sure if that's a thing that helps infrastructure or not.), then travel down Homer Watson -> Fountain until eventually joining back up with Phase 2 at King / Eagle. There's a surplus of possible stops along this route, so it seems obvious to me!

Sorry, but what type of ridership demand would this meet? Beyond Conestoga College I don't think there's much demand in this corridor.

The Sunrise Center, a portion of Westmount,  the Laurentian area, St. Mary's / the Country Hills area, the Homer Watson Business Park, the Pioneer Park area, the Doon South area, and 2 campuses of Conestoga College (as well as the planned massive public recreational complex) were the areas I had been thinking of. Is that too small of a ridership area? I had thought that was pretty significant, but I might be wrong. As well, I'm not overly familiar with how LRT systems work, I had figured that once the system becomes less linear that trains would be able to travel all around, or at least have connecting stations to multiple lines. My suggestion could easily connect to the Mill /Ottawa, Block Line Rd, and Prestonsburg stations. 

I thought I was clever :/. Just a dream, I suppose.
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(08-30-2015, 11:38 PM)GtwoK Wrote: The Sunrise Center, a portion of Westmount,  the Laurentian area, St. Mary's / the Country Hills area, the Homer Watson Business Park, the Pioneer Park area, the Doon South area, and 2 campuses of Conestoga College (as well as the planned massive public recreational complex) were the areas I had been thinking of. Is that too small of a ridership area? I had thought that was pretty significant, but I might be wrong. As well, I'm not overly familiar with how LRT systems work, I had figured that once the system becomes less linear that trains would be able to travel all around, or at least have connecting stations to multiple lines. My suggestion could easily connect to the Mill /Ottawa, Block Line Rd, and Prestonsburg stations.

It really won't be cost-effective for low-density residential areas, such as Country Hills or Pioneer Park.  Those are car-centric areas, and an LRT won't change it for now.
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(08-31-2015, 12:01 AM)tomh009 Wrote: It really won't be cost-effective for low-density residential areas, such as Country Hills or Pioneer Park.  Those are car-centric areas, and an LRT won't change it for now.

Putting an LRT into low-density, car-centric areas can make sense if there is the will to change the nature and density of those areas along the line. If they're to stay as is, then it probably doesn't make sense.

My sense is that the corridors that might make sense after the first line is extended to Galt are 1) Erb/University (the current 202 iXpress) and 2) the Highway 7 corridor to Guelph, including Victoria St and Woodlawn Road, then to U of Guelph.
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I agree that Erb/University and Victoria are the most likely next-candidates for rapid transit, particularly if the transit hub is redeveloped intensely. I think going all the way to Guelph is a big dream, but it's not impossible: the distance is not that great. I've never heard of a proposal for an LRT link between downtown and U of G, though.

Victoria between the big box plaza known as the boardwalk and Breslau. That would be a similar length to Phase I, serve the densest part of the region but also some growth areas, and Victoria is ripe for intensification in many places. It could serve the airport if there was the will. I haven't thought about the right of way, but it seems to me it would be relatively simple through most of that stretch to add tracks in the existing rail corridor adjacent to Victoria. That might be off base, though.
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I doubt it'll ever (in say the next 25-50 years) make sense to go to Guelph.  Between GO service and the new highway 7 I doubt there'd be anywhere close to enough demand to build out the LRT.
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I always look at videos of the Rhoneexpress and think it's just like a Victoria alignment that passes through the airport then along 7 to Guelph. But yeah, going to Guelph is kind of weird. Guelph doesn't have a good enough bus system to work with that, I don't think.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(08-31-2015, 08:10 AM)SammyOES Wrote: I doubt it'll ever (in say the next 25-50 years) make sense to go to Guelph.  Between GO service and the new highway 7 I doubt there'd be anywhere close to enough demand to build out the LRT.

GO serves only the city centres, and is not likely to be better than hourly for quite some time. I'm suggesting a local route that's much more about connecting the areas on Victoria and Woodlawn with each other and with the two city centres.

As for demand, I think it could be there and it would also be a corridor that could be intensified. But the best way to measure demand is to create the route as a bus first.

(08-31-2015, 08:34 AM)Canard Wrote: But yeah, going to Guelph is kind of weird. Guelph doesn't have a good enough bus system to work with that, I don't think.

If an alignment went along Woodlawn, to downtown, and then to U of G, you would cover quite a lot even in the absence of other routes. But at any rate, the quality of a transit system is something that can be changed.
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You're right Canard, Guelph's bus system is mediocre at best. Their system is designed to get students around the city and not their normal citizen base (which is a very car-centric population, ask anyone who lives there that isn't a student), however it's what works for them for now.

I always thought that a loop might be cool for a dream LRT route linking Cambridge, Kitchener, Guelph - from Hespeler / Eagle-Pinebush through Hespeler to the train tracks which lead directly to downtown Guelph then loop back down Highway 7 to Victoria to the future Intermodal Transit Terminal. Some of you might remember a 'Intercity connection' from Hespeler to Guelph back when there was a push to have a Monorail system built instead of LRT, that's going back many of years however. I might still have the maps saved on one of my old desktops that's collecting dust somewhere.
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(08-31-2015, 12:01 AM)tomh009 Wrote:
(08-30-2015, 11:38 PM)GtwoK Wrote: The Sunrise Center, a portion of Westmount,  the Laurentian area, St. Mary's / the Country Hills area, the Homer Watson Business Park, the Pioneer Park area, the Doon South area, and 2 campuses of Conestoga College (as well as the planned massive public recreational complex) were the areas I had been thinking of. Is that too small of a ridership area? I had thought that was pretty significant, but I might be wrong.

It really won't be cost-effective for low-density residential areas, such as Country Hills or Pioneer Park.  Those are car-centric areas, and an LRT won't change it for now.
Step 1, as always, is to have a bus route. If the route cannot support a bus, then it cannot support LRT.
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(08-31-2015, 10:10 AM)gomesjustin Wrote: You're right Canard, Guelph's bus system is mediocre at best. Their system is designed to get students around the city and not their normal citizen base (which is a very car-centric population, ask anyone who lives there that isn't a student), however it's what works for them for now.
Changes to Guelph's system have been proposed, but won't be happening for at least another year.
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