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Wood high-rise construction
#1
The Mjøstårnet construction project is now complete. An 18-storey mixed-use building in Brumunddal, north of Oslo, it's built mainly using glulam and CLT. However, the (floors of the) top seven floors were made with concrete in order to increase the weight of the building, and thus reduce swaying.

The web site of Moelven, which supplied much of the materials, has a lot of photos. I'll include just one here.

   

And, yes, they do fire testing!
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#2
Not a highrise but Pacific FC who are based out of Langford built two new grandstands using CLT and Glulam. You can get a quick view of it on this live youtube feed.

https://youtu.be/X3FNXyryom8 you can search back through the video to see the stands.
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#3
(05-02-2019, 09:27 AM)welltoldtales Wrote: Not a highrise but Pacific FC who are based out of Langford built two new grandstands using CLT and Glulam. You can get a quick view of it on this live youtube feed.

https://youtu.be/X3FNXyryom8 you can search back through the video to see the stands.

Also in the CPL, York9 intends to use wood to build its permanent stadium once they secure a site.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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#4
Wow there's just something about that that makes me uneasy.
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#5
It's no the only one -- here is one nearly as tall, under construction in Vienna.

[Image: file-5_800x600.jpg]

And the 32m-tall pagoda at Houryuu-ji in Japan has been standing over 1400 years.
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#6
(05-07-2019, 10:11 AM)tomh009 Wrote: And the 32m-tall pagoda at Houryuu-ji in Japan has been standing over 1400 years.

What does this sentence from the Wikipedia entry mean? "The [restoration] project was interrupted during the Second World War, when large portions of the temple itself were dismantled and hidden in the hills surrounding Nara."

Ah: "At Houryuu-ji not only is the same ヒノキ wood used in any renovations, but also care is taken to find wood with similar blemishes to the original." (https://blog.gaijinpot.com/problem-with-...-in-japan/)
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#7
(05-07-2019, 07:07 AM)Spokes Wrote: Wow there's just something about that that makes me uneasy.

At first it's easy to think wood = bad idea for a high rise but the way the material is made and used makes it incredibly safe. There have been some tests on cross laminated timber that show it can have an equivalent fire resistance as concrete, withstanding extremely high temperatures for hours. The likelihood of a wooden highrise burning down is unlikely. Still, it's hard to disassociate wood and fire haha.
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#8
(06-03-2019, 01:50 PM)ac3r Wrote:
(05-07-2019, 07:07 AM)Spokes Wrote: Wow there's just something about that that makes me uneasy.

At first it's easy to think wood = bad idea for a high rise but the way the material is made and used makes it incredibly safe. There have been some tests on cross laminated timber that show it can have an equivalent fire resistance as concrete, withstanding extremely high temperatures for hours. The likelihood of a wooden highrise burning down is unlikely. Still, it's hard to disassociate wood and fire haha.

I tend to think more along the line, not of fire code, but of noise. Concrete buildings tend to be a little more quiet, and for residential stuff, that's a good thing. Years ago we rented an apartment that was wood frame, and you could hear the neighbours upstairs like they were in the next room. Another apartment I had in Hamilton was concrete and you rarely heard anything, same with the place in Scarborough.
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#9
Yeah, the wood-frame apartments on David Street that I've visited are really noisy but I think a lot of smaller places that go with that kind of stick and frame build are trying to save money so of course noise reduction is considered a luxury. I imagine engineered wood beams are used more like steel members in a high-rise and might be comparable in a fire situation. I also think there's a huge carbon capture benefit to using wood in construction, concrete and steel both use a lot of carbon in their production, especially concrete since it isn't as recycled as steel.
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#10
(06-04-2019, 01:15 AM)jeffster Wrote:
(06-03-2019, 01:50 PM)ac3r Wrote: At first it's easy to think wood = bad idea for a high rise but the way the material is made and used makes it incredibly safe. There have been some tests on cross laminated timber that show it can have an equivalent fire resistance as concrete, withstanding extremely high temperatures for hours. The likelihood of a wooden highrise burning down is unlikely. Still, it's hard to disassociate wood and fire haha.

I tend to think more along the line, not of fire code, but of noise. Concrete buildings tend to be a little more quiet, and for residential stuff, that's a good thing. Years ago we rented an apartment that was wood frame, and you could hear the neighbours upstairs like they were in the next room. Another apartment I had in Hamilton was concrete and you rarely heard anything, same with the place in Scarborough.

The wood-frame high-rise buildings are likely built with concrete floorplates, which mitigates the noise through the floor. Possibly your apartment had wood floors, too?

On the other hand, many concrete buildings are built using steel frames, which are prone to transmission of noise and vibrations. A wood frame would actually be better than a steel frame in that regard.
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#11
(06-04-2019, 09:45 AM)tomh009 Wrote:
(06-04-2019, 01:15 AM)jeffster Wrote: I tend to think more along the line, not of fire code, but of noise. Concrete buildings tend to be a little more quiet, and for residential stuff, that's a good thing. Years ago we rented an apartment that was wood frame, and you could hear the neighbours upstairs like they were in the next room. Another apartment I had in Hamilton was concrete and you rarely heard anything, same with the place in Scarborough.

The wood-frame high-rise buildings are likely built with concrete floorplates, which mitigates the noise through the floor. Possibly your apartment had wood floors, too?

On the other hand, many concrete buildings are built using steel frames, which are prone to transmission of noise and vibrations. A wood frame would actually be better than a steel frame in that regard.

Yeah, the entire apartment was entirely wood. When we were shopping for a condo, we had looked at a couple units that were also wood frame construction. That one on Westmount between Gage and Glasgow (right side if headed toward Waterloo) and also there was one on Bridge St close to Lancaster. Deal breaker for us.
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