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Recycling Issues
From the Record: Waterloo Region sees 'significant jump' in green bin use
June collection was 2,000 tonnes, and 9,200 tonnes year-to-date. That should put us on track to meet the 20,000 tonne estimate this year, given that the new rules didn't start until March.
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Green bin use is up so much that the region is projecting that they will have to find other processors to take the excess.

"The Region’s green bin organics are consolidated at the Cambridge and Waterloo waste management sites and transferred to the City of Guelph’s organics waste management facility in accordance with a ten year contract that expires in October 2023 (with two optional five year extensions). Under this contract, the Region is guaranteed 20,000 tonnes of processing capacity annually. As noted previously, we are anticipating exceeding the 20,000 tonne annual threshold in 2017, likely falling somewhere in the range of 500 to 2,000 tonnes of additional green bin organics by year end."

"In discussions with the City of Guelph, they are presently unable to accept additional green bin material in excess of the 20,000 tonnes they are contractually obligated to receive in 2017 due to processing capacity constraints. Therefore, as a short term measure, staff have secured capacity with two (2) processors; namely, Bio-En Power Inc. (Elmira, ON) and All-Treat Farms (Arthur, ON) to accommodate green bin tonnage in excess of 20,000 tonnes on an as-required basis to the end of 2017. Similar to Guelph, both of these processors operate in accordance with applicable Provincial regulatory criteria and produce a high quality soil amendment for use primarily on agricultural fields."

"Staff have commenced a review of a number of options for 2018 and beyond including discussions with a number of organics processing facilities/vendors to determine capacity availability as well as
continued dialogue/meetings with the City of Guelph to determine if, how and under what terms and conditions the Region can potentially secure additional capacity at the Guelph processing facility beyond the 20,000 tonnes already committed."
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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Fantastic! Now we just need to get multi-residential buildings (and restaurants) into the program ...
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According to the City of Guelph, their facility can process 30,000 tonnes of material each year.  Currently, Guelph produces 10,000/year with the expectation that it will grow to 16,000. They contracted with the Region of Waterloo to use the 20,000 tonnes in excess capacity.  I'm not sure what their plan was if the Guelph usage grew and while they were still committed to taking the Region of Waterloo's material.

I also know that they apparently rented the excess capacity to another customer when initially the Region of Waterloo didn't provide enough organic waste.
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(10-23-2017, 11:44 AM)nms Wrote: According to the City of Guelph, their facility can process 30,000 tonnes of material each year.  Currently, Guelph produces 10,000/year with the expectation that it will grow to 16,000. They contracted with the Region of Waterloo to use the 20,000 tonnes in excess capacity.  I'm not sure what their plan was if the Guelph usage grew and while they were still committed to taking the Region of Waterloo's material.

I also know that they apparently rented the excess capacity to another customer when initially the Region of Waterloo didn't provide enough organic waste.

Storage lockers? Big Grin

Coke
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