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Cycling in Waterloo Region
#31
(11-14-2014, 01:14 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: I don't buy it, starting from the scary quotes on engineered solution and moving on to the ridiculous: The radiant heat that will be produced by the paving will cause dieback of the old growth forest that remains in the park.

That also caught my eye. I doubt there's any old growth in Waterloo Region. It all used to be farms, yes?

This is a tiny amount of pavement compared to the amount of roads that we have around here. Also, less road traffic means less need for car-focussed roads.

I was also wondering about asphalt lifetime. Seems that without cars, it should last longer.
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#32
(11-14-2014, 04:02 PM)plam Wrote: I was also wondering about asphalt lifetime. Seems that without cars, it should last longer.

Of course. Asphalt walking paths at the university have lifetimes measured in decades.
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#33
What about the author's contention that sections of pavement are destined to wash away or collapse long before the asphalt deteriorates naturally? I've seen this happen on other paved trails.
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#34
(11-14-2014, 04:46 PM)ookpik Wrote: What about the author's contention that sections of pavement are destined to wash away or collapse long before the asphalt deteriorates naturally? I've seen this happen on other paved trails.

Worse than the gravel that is already washing away? That is clearly bad.
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#35
(11-14-2014, 04:46 PM)ookpik Wrote: What about the author's contention that sections of pavement are destined to wash away or collapse long before the asphalt deteriorates naturally? I've seen this happen on other paved trails.

As plam says, it couldn't possibly be worse than gravel. Not even close. 
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#36
But, seeing as the gravel already washes out, it may be true that asphalt may also wash out over time as well. I asked a civil engineering faculty colleague of mine: when water gets underneath asphalt, it does move the asphalt (even potentially uphill). We'll have to see what happens with this path in the next few years.
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#37
I understand the worry about the asphalt crumbling away, and it will almost certainly happen without extensive works to improve drainage with ditches on either side of the path.

However, the simply asphalt layer is much better than what's there now, and the perfect is the enemy of the good (and the budget).
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#38
(11-14-2014, 05:57 PM)plam Wrote: But, seeing as the gravel already washes out, it may be true that asphalt may also wash out over time as well. I asked a civil engineering faculty colleague of mine: when water gets underneath asphalt, it does move the asphalt (even potentially uphill). We'll have to see what happens with this path in the next few years.

Yes asphalt will eventually wash out too. But it will take a lot longer particularly if the grade was properly thought out, which we have no reason to assume it wasn't.
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#39
(11-14-2014, 05:58 PM)Markster Wrote: I understand the worry about the asphalt crumbling away, and it will almost certainly happen without extensive works to improve drainage with ditches on either side of the path.  

However, the simply asphalt layer is much better than what's there now, and the perfect is the enemy of the good (and the budget).

Yeah. In the same vein, holding out for a boardwalk is not really the right thing (and that would get far more icy in the winter). I was thinking about the paved path in Waterloo Park (not the gravel, which is terrible) and I suppose that the ditches help a lot there.
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#40
(11-14-2014, 07:08 PM)plam Wrote:
(11-14-2014, 05:58 PM)Markster Wrote: I understand the worry about the asphalt crumbling away, and it will almost certainly happen without extensive works to improve drainage with ditches on either side of the path.  

However, the simply asphalt layer is much better than what's there now, and the perfect is the enemy of the good (and the budget).

Yeah. In the same vein, holding out for a boardwalk is not really the right thing (and that would get far more icy in the winter). I was thinking about the paved path in Waterloo Park (not the gravel, which is terrible) and I suppose that the ditches help a lot there.
 All this discourse is much ado about nothing!

Example: The asphalt pathways and gravel pathways/bike trails in Waterloo Park have been there for 50 plus years ... yes they require maintenance and have been resurfaced or changed from one type to another but the world didn't fall apart regardless of what pathway type is used in one of the nicest parks in Waterloo region.
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