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Walking in Waterloo Region
(10-18-2018, 05:29 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(10-18-2018, 05:22 PM)Xiaoming Wrote: This scheme can be calculated using the Queue Theory to see if it can reduce waiting time. If it reduces the total waiting time, it benefits the public.

Xiaoming Guo
Kitchener Trustee Candidate of Waterloo Region District School Board.

Waiting time is not the only consideration, safety is, I would argue, more important.

Human beings are also somewhat more complex than a mathematical term.  Queue theory is not 100% accurate in predicting outcomes.  For example, it would predict the wait time to be higher for cars, because models we use wouldn't anticipate the intentional driving in front of pedestrians by some drivers which is observed.

And as a final note, having read Donald Shoups book on parking, I have somewhat less faith in civil engineers' rigour than I had previously.  My experience with some of the engineers at the region hasn't helped this opinion.

Given the low financial cost of converting to a scramble, and the ease of validating the important metrics, I'd argue a better option is to convert this intersection to a scramble for 2-3 years, and observe the outcome.

There are cities already used the scrambles. We should assess their experiences to find out the pros and cons, then evaluate our circumstance to decide whether we would like to implement it. There are must be some research on this. 

Xiaoming Guo
Kitchener Trustee Candidate of Waterloo Regional District School Board.
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(10-18-2018, 05:29 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(10-18-2018, 05:22 PM)Xiaoming Wrote: This scheme can be calculated using the Queue Theory to see if it can reduce waiting time. If it reduces the total waiting time, it benefits the public.

Xiaoming Guo
Kitchener Trustee Candidate of Waterloo Region District School Board.

Waiting time is not the only consideration, safety is, I would argue, more important.

Human beings are also somewhat more complex than a mathematical term.  Queue theory is not 100% accurate in predicting outcomes.  For example, it would predict the wait time to be higher for cars, because models we use wouldn't anticipate the intentional driving in front of pedestrians by some drivers which is observed.

And as a final note, having read Donald Shoups book on parking, I have somewhat less faith in civil engineers' rigour than I had previously.  My experience with some of the engineers at the region hasn't helped this opinion.

Given the low financial cost of converting to a scramble, and the ease of validating the important metrics, I'd argue a better option is to convert this intersection to a scramble for 2-3 years, and observe the outcome.

That's what I keep coming back to.  What has the Region got to lose?
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I think that having the Region only be in charge of the highest capacity roads gives their staff an unfortunate bias - they, more than their city counterparts, are more focused on moving vehicles through the network and don't stop to consider the finer details.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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I think having the city and region in charge of separate roads is an issue to be honest.
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