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General Township Updates and Rumours
#61
(11-29-2017, 11:33 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: Or a trail and improved transit.  The last thing that area needs on market days is more cars.

Waterloo has been looking into the feasibility of moving the TCT to run along the rail corridor to the market.
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#62
(11-29-2017, 11:33 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: Or a trail and improved transit.  The last thing that area needs on market days is more cars.

Transit would take some pressure off, potentially. But what bus routing could be used to get decent ridership, enough to significantly reduce parking requirements?

A trail would indeed be nice but realistically I think the impact on parking availability would be quite small.
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#63
Is there information about how many people at the market are from out-of-town?
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#64
I biked from work once to the St. Jacobs Market and then home with my groceries, it was not a great experience. Perhaps with a bike trailer this would be more realistic for myself, but I don't know how popular cycling to and from the market would be as it is a fair distance for a lot of people to cart food.

Whereas the Kitchener market is centrally located and I used to bike or walk there often to get groceries.
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#65
(11-30-2017, 11:22 AM)rangersfan Wrote: I biked from work once to the St. Jacobs Market and then home with my groceries, it was not a great experience. Perhaps with a bike trailer this would be more realistic for myself, but I don't know how popular cycling to and from the market would be as it is a fair distance for a lot of people to cart food.

Whereas the Kitchener market is centrally located and I used to bike or walk there often to get groceries.

I think St. Jacobs is as close to my house as the Kitchener market, but I prefer the Kitchener market. Usually I put my stuff in a backpack.

The one time I did go to St. Jacobs I did notice a lot of people from out of town.
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#66
I think a second transit route (connecting at Northfield ION) is on GRT's radar.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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#67
The Waterloo Central extension might help.
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#68
(11-30-2017, 04:00 PM)KevinL Wrote: I think a second transit route (connecting at Northfield ION) is on GRT's radar.

GRT has Route 19 A/B planned to service the area in the 2018 system update.

Quote:Route 19A (Hazel): New route provides service along Hazel and West Ring Road, with a branch to St. Jacob's Farmers Market via Parkside and Benjamin. There would be better-than-15-minute peak service along Hazel . Buses would continue as Route 9 at University of Waterloo Station.

Quote:Route 19B (Hazel/Kumpf) : New route provides service along Hazel and West Ring Road with a branch to Kumpf Industrial Area via Parkside and Randall. Would have better-than-15-minute peak service along Hazel. Buses would continue as Route 9 at University of Waterloo Station
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#69
(11-30-2017, 11:22 AM)rangersfan Wrote: I biked from work once to the St. Jacobs Market and then home with my groceries, it was not a great experience. Perhaps with a bike trailer this would be more realistic for myself, but I don't know how popular cycling to and from the market would be as it is a fair distance for a lot of people to cart food.

Whereas the Kitchener market is centrally located and I used to bike or walk there often to get groceries.

Are you referring to carrying groceries or infrastructure?

Carrying groceries is no issue for an individual like me who has a properly outfitted commuter bike, I just strap on my backs and I can carry several days of groceries without anything more.  If I had put on my touring paniers, I can carry a weeks groceries easily.  Carrying them in a backpack, or worse, on the handlebars, is definitely uncomfortable and treacherous.

As for infrastructure, yes, it is not ideal, and has several glaring issues, and, frankly, is very hard to find, if they were to build a trail (which they are planning to do) it would suddenly become quite easy.

I think the market is well suited too it, for pretty much anyone in the city of Waterloo and North Kitchener, who are near the trail network, it would be a perfectly feasible, and fun, family outing in the spring, summer, and fall.  It really isn't that far.  But they do need to build the trail.
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#70
Give some dedicated access for bike parking to be adjacent to the market stalls, and for bike infrastructure to connect directly to that (including crossing priority), and suddenly you've got a compelling alternative (thanks to the rewards) to driving and enjoying the driving and parking "experience".
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#71
Residents in Maryhill are concerned that a new cellular tower will ruin the cultural vistas of their settlement.

https://www.therecord.com/news-story/840...-maryhill/
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#72
(04-19-2018, 04:39 AM)rangersfan Wrote: Residents in Maryhill are concerned that a new cellular tower will ruin the cultural vistas of their settlement.

https://www.therecord.com/news-story/840...-maryhill/

Not sure what to think. People want cellphone service, but they don't want the tower. Can't have it both ways. I think there is also an issue with the suggestion that the towers have a certain range...so place it closer to a large city like Kitchener. Fine, but cell phones aren't smart enough not go onto a tower that is meant for Maryhill, but not only that, you cannot put huge towers in a city as they affect the smaller towers that our scattered everywhere.

As for range, that is under ideal conditions. You get snow or rain or heavy fog, range is reduced.

Good article on cell coverage here:

https://www.outsideonline.com/2186591/ho...nes-signal
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#73
I don't have much sympathy for these people... the older part of Maryhill around the intersection has a lot of trees and it's hard to see much of anything when you're standing in the town.
Really the nicest views of the church are from outside the village itself rather than in it. The newer subdivision just north of the church doesn't have the mature trees that the old part of the village does so maybe they should just plant a bunch of trees so they don't have to look at the cell tower.

I think it's a bit disingenuous to equate a gravel pit and a cell tower, they are two very different things and no one has to look at a cell tower but everyone has to deal with dump trucks on the roads and all the other physical consequences of a gravel put. If those people that opposed really wanted to keep some nice views they should pay for the tower to be disguised as a Minaret Wink
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#74
(04-19-2018, 09:13 AM)clasher Wrote: I don't have much sympathy for these people... the older part of Maryhill around the intersection has a lot of trees and it's hard to see much of anything when you're standing in the town.
Really the nicest views of the church are from outside the village itself rather than in it. The newer subdivision just north of the church doesn't have the mature trees that the old part of the village does so maybe they should just plant a bunch of trees so they don't have to look at the cell tower.

What’s ironic is they probably use their cellphones to organize their opposition Tongue

How about this: put the cell tower on top of the church spire. Then the church will still be the tallest building in town!
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