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Population and Housing
According to Jeff O and the Canadian Census the region is attracting a smaller share of immigrants now than it has in the past. I found this surprising considering that the local tech industry seems to be hiring readily. Another factor that could be that during the previous census period RIM/BlackBerry was in it's hiring heyday and may have had a strong influence on attracting immigrants here.

https://www.therecord.com/news-story/768...mmigrants/
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The numbers of immigrants have been pretty static for the past 15 years, have they not?
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The note of the Region getting a small proportion of Canada's total immigration is a weird one to pick for a headline (1 of 57 in 2001, 1 of 86 now). It doesn't really say much without other stats to compare to. Are we getting worse? Or are other places just getting better?

Notable stats:

Quote:This region added 14,045 immigrants between 2011 and 2016. It's the fewest number to settle here in the last three censuses. Immigration to Canada soared by 30 per cent over the same period.
The number of visible minorities has more than doubled since 2001 to reach 100,025 residents.
Visible minorities represent 19 per cent of the regional population today, up from 10 per cent in 2001, census findings show. "I believe that we all benefit from diversity," Harrison said.

Really interesting these.
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It would be interesting to cross-reference these with other stats. For instance, if a visible minority immigrates to Toronto prior to 2011 for secondary school, then comes here for school and then stays, do they still count as an immigrant when the census comes around?

Similarly, I'd be interested to know of that 14,045 that arrived from 2011 to 2016, what fields did they end up in? I suspect a broad mix. On the other hand if there is a shortage of jobs that either don't require Canadian credentials or for which credentials are relatively quick to get (think taxi driver, or personal support worker), then that could limit a larger wave of immigrants being attracted to the Region.
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(10-27-2017, 11:58 AM)nms Wrote: It would be interesting to cross-reference these with other stats.  For instance, if a visible minority immigrates to Toronto prior to 2011 for secondary school, then comes here for school and then stays, do they still count as an immigrant when the census comes around?

Similarly, I'd be interested to know of that 14,045 that arrived from 2011 to 2016, what fields did they end up in? I suspect a broad mix.  On the other hand if there is a shortage of jobs that either don't require Canadian credentials or for which credentials are relatively quick to get (think taxi driver, or personal support worker), then that could limit a larger wave of immigrants being attracted to the Region.

They would still be first generation (visible minority or otherwise), so yes.
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Statscan does track migration within/between provinces/CMAs, etc. You just have to find the right tables:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/20...04-eng.htm
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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