Welcome Guest! In order to take advantage of all the great features that Waterloo Region Connected has to offer, including participating in the lively discussions below, you're going to have to register. The good news is that it'll take less than a minute and you can get started enjoying Waterloo Region's best online community right away. Click here to get started.

Dear WRConnected Users: Three whole years! We've grown so much over the past three years, and much of that is because of you, the amazing WRConnected Users. But like any other website, there are costs associated with running it. To this point it has been funded out of my own pocket. As some of you may already know, we accept donations. Some of you have made donations (thank you!). This helps cover all of the background costs associated with running this site. If every user were to donate $1 we would more than cover our yearly expenses. If WRConnected is useful to you, take a minute and help keep it online for another year. Any donation is helpful. Thank you.


Thread Rating:
  • 4 Vote(s) - 2.75 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Trails
#61
(07-02-2015, 08:32 AM)ookpik Wrote:
Quote:The real place where work is needed is where the Laurel trail crosses Weber. I know this is on the city planners' minds.
The issue is that there's a trail "discontinuity" there between Weber and Moses Springer park. They need to extend the trail along the creek NE-bound from Weber to the park as well as provide for a proper, safe crossing.

That would be nice! But the current intent is to provide a useful crossing of Weber at MacKay, and use MacKay as a connector to Moses Springer the same way Carter is a connector from MS to the Hillside Park trail. Right now, getting across Weber here is pretty tough especially at p.m. rush hour. For Laurel trail to be contiguous and family friendly, that's a bigger impediment than building a trail connection along the creek.

Incidentally, the plan (at least as of late 2013) is detailed in this public information centre material: http://www.waterloo.ca/en/contentresourc...r_2013.pdf

Obviously some of the dates were optimistic, and other details may have been altered (for instance, they heard pretty clearly that the situation at Weber needed improvement.)
Reply
#62
(07-02-2015, 09:05 AM)zanate Wrote: Incidentally, the plan (at least as of late 2013) is detailed in this public information centre material: http://www.waterloo.ca/en/contentresourc...r_2013.pdf
Thank you for that. It covers several street crossings that I've complained to my councillor about being uninviting, let alone dangerous, for pedestrians and cyclists. Strange that she never brought this document or the public consultations to my attention Huh
Reply
#63
If only they could have made the Weber crossing like the Lexington trail underpass...
Reply
#64
The Iron Horse Trail in Waterloo received the final layer of asphalt yesterday. There's one small section at John that still requires concrete.
Reply
#65
Super frustrating that it's been missing that piece of concrete for weeks now.
Reply
#66
I'm loving the new section of Laurel Trail they paved at Research and Technology Park! Much easier to bike up compared to that very steep hill.

[Image: IMG_20150716_195514_zpsfgozxeoz.jpg]
Reply
#67
Where in the R&T park is thst? I don't recognize the photo.
Reply
#68
I disagree, that land along both sides of the laurel creek on the university north campus is supposed to be environmental reserve, but the university and city keep finding ways to build and pave things. I would much rather see permeable surface trails, less manicuring, and building altogether.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
Reply
#69
(07-21-2015, 10:50 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I disagree, that land along both sides of the laurel creek on the university north campus is supposed to be environmental reserve, but the university and city keep finding ways to build and pave things. I would much rather see permeable surface trails, less manicuring, and building altogether.

Persons with disabilities, families with carts/buggies/strollers and wheelchair users will find these paved trails wonderful additions that open up the community and open spaces to all.

 Thanks City of Waterloo keep up the great work on open access. A much needed and welcome new trail.
Reply
#70
(07-21-2015, 10:50 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I disagree, that land along both sides of the laurel creek on the university north campus is supposed to be environmental reserve, but the university and city keep finding ways to build and pave things. I would much rather see permeable surface trails, less manicuring, and building altogether.

This seems like the perfect place to use porous asphalt. I'm sure the university could also re-pave all its parking lots with porous asphalt and that would have a huge impact on stormwater runoff.
Reply
#71
(07-22-2015, 07:54 AM)clasher Wrote: This seems like the perfect place to use porous asphalt. I'm sure the university could also re-pave all its parking lots with porous asphalt and that would have a huge impact on stormwater runoff.

My impression is that porous asphalt technology is not yet in a state that makes it practical in cold climates.
Reply
#72
Ashphalt? Perhaps not. But pavement is possible: https://uwaterloo.ca/student-success/blo...ainability

Not sure about snow clearing. I can't remember what happened in winter there.
Reply
#73
(07-21-2015, 10:50 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I disagree, that land along both sides of the laurel creek on the university north campus is supposed to be environmental reserve, but the university and city keep finding ways to build and pave things.

I understand your point, but I'm all for paved pedestrian trails. I don't particularly feel that 3m wide paved recreational trails is a significant impact, compared to the adjacent acres of parking lots.
Reply
#74
(07-22-2015, 11:24 AM)Markster Wrote: I understand your point, but I'm all for paved pedestrian trails.  I don't particularly feel that 3m wide paved recreational trails is a significant impact, compared to the adjacent acres of parking lots.

This. We need to keep an eye on the big picture. Also as it was pointed out, people on wheelchairs and strollers require a paved trial.
Reply
#75
(07-22-2015, 11:11 AM)plam Wrote: Not sure about snow clearing. I can't remember what happened in winter there.

The section north of the lake and west of R+T isn't cleared. In my experience it's impassable by foot during most of winter, except by the most determined users. Snow shoes, skis or crampons are generally required depending on the state of the trail.

As for porous pavement I share the same concern about durability over winter freeze/thaw cycles that others have expressed. 
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)