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Winter Walking and Cycling
#41
(01-10-2018, 10:47 AM)MidTowner Wrote: I've heard from some of my neighbours this year (who don't walk, but do have to clear their sidewalks) that they wish the city would just do it.

One of my neighbours got a letter or something in December from the city because she hadn't cleared it. We wound up out shoveling together, and she recalled that she read it would cost around $40 a year extra in taxes (she was misremembering- it's even less) and wondered who would be too cheap to realise that's a great deal.

The only people to benefit from not having the city do it, are the ones who don't bother, or who do a piss poor job of it.  Even people who do it themselves who feel their time has no marginal value will spend more than that in salt/sand/shovels in a year, if the walks are well cleared and free of ice.
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#42
Honestly, those people don't benefit from it either. Presumably they walk at least once each winter, and would benefit from improved conditions.

Other people who might claim they'd prefer not to have the city do it include people on my street who have no sidewalks in front of their homes. Really wish they'd put them in, narrowing the street so it'd slow down the speed demons.
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#43
(01-10-2018, 01:39 PM)chutten Wrote: Honestly, those people don't benefit from it either. Presumably they walk at least once each winter, and would benefit from improved conditions.

Other people who might claim they'd prefer not to have the city do it include people on my street who have no sidewalks in front of their homes. Really wish they'd put them in, narrowing the street so it'd slow down the speed demons.

That's a big assumption, there are plenty of people who never ever ever walk anywhere, who will literally drive to the store on the corner, these people may never once walk on an uncleared city sidewalk or use a curb ramp.

But yes, you're right, those who have no sidewalks are probably the biggest group of beneficiaries of the current policy.
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#44
I live on a crescent without sidewalks, but I still would have no issue with paying extra for consistency across the city.
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#45
Odds are that for the person living on Random Court, OneOfMany Crescent, or AnyOther Place, their entire right of way (which we pay to plow) gets far less human traffic of all combined modes over the course of a day than the sidewalks on Caroline get of pedestrians over the course of an hour. Yet we plow one without question, and not the other.
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#46
Well, lanes carry cars which are dangerous enough on dry pavement. So it isn't too unreasonable that we plough them.

It _is_ unreasonable that we aren't also ploughing sidewalks.
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#47
(01-10-2018, 03:47 PM)chutten Wrote: Well, lanes carry cars which are dangerous enough on dry pavement. So it isn't too unreasonable that we plough them.

It _is_ unreasonable that we aren't also ploughing sidewalks.

I'm not sure residential streets which aren't plowed are less safe, they might even be safer, because speeds are lower and roads are effectively narrowed.
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#48
(01-10-2018, 02:09 PM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: Odds are that for the person living on Random Court, OneOfMany Crescent, or AnyOther Place, their entire right of way (which we pay to plow) gets far less human traffic of all combined modes over the course of a day than the sidewalks on Caroline get of pedestrians over the course of an hour. Yet we plow one without question, and not the other.

Good point. It would be fun to see what would happen if we re-prioritized plowing by cost divided by estimated traffic, rather than on arbitrary factors such as whether the route in question is for people walking or for people driving. I’m thinking the suburbs would pretty quickly agree that the lowest traffic level worthy of being plowed is a very low one!
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#49
Can someone remind me where the cost estimate for city-plowed sidewalks comes from? I'm assuming it's based on contracting out rather than using municipal employees and equipment. What impact would the increased minimum wage have, I wonder.
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#50
(01-10-2018, 04:56 PM)panamaniac Wrote: Can someone remind me where the cost estimate for city-plowed sidewalks comes from?  I'm assuming it's based on contracting out rather than using municipal employees and equipment.   What impact would the increased minimum wage have, I wonder.

Staff prepared a report where they estimated the cost for sidewalk maintenance, it isn't contracted, it's based on the city buying plows and hiring people to operate them.  This makes more sense at the scale the city runs at, especially since the city already runs snow removal.
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