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General Politics Discussion
(10-19-2018, 12:30 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: Why are rides to polling stations by candidates and their teams allowed then? That would seem much more incentivising or pressure than what themuseum is offering and they are offeing their "reward" after the act of voting, not before, like a ride to the polling station.

Rides are an affordance...simply paying someone for voting is different.

I can see the difference, even if I'm undecided on whether either it is a good or bad idea.  I do see the risk for bias in both cases.
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(10-19-2018, 09:26 AM)welltoldtales Wrote: This is why we can't have nice things.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener...-1.4869654

We have politicians who lie, cheat and commit criminal acts and this is what the elections law flags ... supercilious!
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I'm sure there's some legal precedent indicating why materially encouraging people to vote in general is considered as bad as getting them to vote for a particular candidate, but I'm not sure how significant it is and if it still holds water today.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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This is proof that there is no such thing as common sense.  There is learned sense and clearly she has not learned it....
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(10-19-2018, 08:19 PM)KevinL Wrote: I'm sure there's some legal precedent indicating why materially encouraging people to vote in general is considered as bad as getting them to vote for a particular candidate, but I'm not sure how significant it is and if it still holds water today.

I think the obvious answer is that you can target citizens likely to vote for your preferred candidate depending on what incentive you offer.
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So while it is easy to beat up on a city staffer because they sent an email, let me give you some perspective....

I used to work with someone who was the one in charge of the election. That person is PERSONALLY responsible for the election under the Act. They are open to lawsuits, etc. IN ADDITION to the city. So they can choose to ignore The Museum (which I agree was a creative marketing ploy that really stood to do zero harm to the election), however, if a candidate who lost decided to sue the Chief Elections Officer for failure to ensure that the Act was complied with, his/her life would be complicated in ways I wouldn't want to deal with. Much easier to send a cease and desist letter. The current holder of the job (Christine Tarling) is a city solicitor, so I don't blame her one bit for covering her "legal" butt.

Coke
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(10-26-2018, 10:03 AM)Coke6pk Wrote: So while it is easy to beat up on a city staffer because they sent an email, let me give you some perspective....

I used to work with someone who was the one in charge of the election.  That person is PERSONALLY responsible for the election under the Act.  They are open to lawsuits, etc. IN ADDITION to the city.  So they can choose to ignore The Museum (which I agree was a creative marketing ploy that really stood to do zero harm to the election), however, if a candidate who lost decided to sue the Chief Elections Officer for failure to ensure that the Act was complied with, his/her life would be complicated in ways I wouldn't want to deal with.  Much easier to send a cease and desist letter.  The current holder of the job (Christine Tarling) is a city solicitor, so I don't blame her one bit for covering her "legal" butt.

Coke

Good comment. I would add that often people just assume that they can do whatever, when in fact there are long-standing rules governing how things have to be done. This is especially true around important procedures like elections. The Museum should have checked on the legality of their proposed promotion before beginning it. They are a big enough organization that they can be expected to do some due diligence; they aren’t a kid’s lemonade stand.
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Potential 36% pay raise for Cambridge councilors and mayor:  https://www.therecord.com/opinion-story/...uncillors/
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Doug Craig is apparently not yet done wanting to serve the Cambridge area and will seek federal conservative nomination in 2019.

According to the CTV article his top priority is local GO train service.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener...-1.4902196
https://www.therecord.com/news-story/902...next-year/
https://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/outgoing-ma...-1.4174105
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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Isn't that a provincial issue though?
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(11-13-2018, 12:50 AM)Spokes Wrote: Isn't that a provincial issue though?

Unless, through some miracle, the federal government figures out how encourage federally regulated railways (ie who operate across provincial boundaries) to better accommodate passenger operations.
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I think there was some discussion about Bill 66 elsewhere, but I can't remember which thread. In any case, I've seen referenced that the open-for-business by-law would only apply if it can be shown that 50/100 jobs will be created (depending on the size of the municipality). I've read the proposed legislation, and I can't seem to find this in there. Does anyone have anymore insight into that condition?
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(Yesterday, 04:11 PM)jamincan Wrote: I think there was some discussion about Bill 66 elsewhere, but I can't remember which thread. In any case, I've seen referenced that the open-for-business by-law would only apply if it can be shown that 50/100 jobs will be created (depending on the size of the municipality). I've read the proposed legislation, and I can't seem to find this in there. Does anyone have anymore insight into that condition?

Regulation 013-4239:
https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/013-4239
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