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Population and Housing
The Record has an article on the latest regional population numbers.

https://www.therecord.com/news-story/954...-in-cores/
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$184 million in building permits were issued in the KCW CMA in August, down from $211 million in July.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-qu...3a-eng.htm
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Ontario Government released Population Projections for the region up to 2041. Looks like they expect 821,000 people to live in the region by then. Interesting note is that they expect wellington to reach 324,500 people. Presumably most of these numbers are concentrated in the urban areas of Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge and Guelph. So one could assume the the the Combined population of the 4 urban centres would be over 1 million people by 2041! Also Waterloo has already surpassed Hamilton in terms of population and the gap will continue to grow. 

https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/dem...able4.html
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(10-09-2019, 08:55 AM)westwardloo Wrote: Ontario Government released Population Projections for the region up to 2041. Looks like they expect 821,000 people to live in the region by then. Interesting note is that they expect wellington to reach 324,500 people. Presumably most of these numbers are concentrated in the urban areas of Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge and Guelph. So one could assume the the the Combined population of the 4 urban centres would be over 1 million people by 2041! Also Waterloo has already surpassed Hamilton in terms of population and the gap will continue to grow. 

https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/dem...able4.html

The City of Toronto is projected to grow by 1.3M people, to about 4.2M total. Given that there is practically no available empty land, housing for those 1.3M people will need to come from intensification and redevelopment of industrial land.
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(10-08-2019, 11:17 PM)jwilliamson Wrote: $184 million in building permits were issued in the KCW CMA in August, down from $211 million in July.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-qu...3a-eng.htm

Down, but still very impressive.
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(10-09-2019, 12:04 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 08:55 AM)westwardloo Wrote: Ontario Government released Population Projections for the region up to 2041. Looks like they expect 821,000 people to live in the region by then. Interesting note is that they expect wellington to reach 324,500 people. Presumably most of these numbers are concentrated in the urban areas of Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge and Guelph. So one could assume the the the Combined population of the 4 urban centres would be over 1 million people by 2041! Also Waterloo has already surpassed Hamilton in terms of population and the gap will continue to grow. 

https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/dem...able4.html

The City of Toronto is projected to grow by 1.3M people, to about 4.2M total. Given that there is practically no available empty land, housing for those 1.3M people will need to come from intensification and redevelopment of industrial land.

Where the heck are they going to put everyone?  That's crazy.
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(10-09-2019, 12:49 PM)Spokes Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 12:04 PM)tomh009 Wrote: The City of Toronto is projected to grow by 1.3M people, to about 4.2M total. Given that there is practically no available empty land, housing for those 1.3M people will need to come from intensification and redevelopment of industrial land.

Where the heck are they going to put everyone?  That's crazy.

Allowing basement apartments, “granny suites” in small backyard and laneway buildings, duplexes, triplexes, and townhouses in “single-family” residential zoning would probably do it. Add in a few large towers here and there and it’s probably no problem to put another couple of million people into the City.

More important is building Transit City.
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(10-09-2019, 01:38 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 12:49 PM)Spokes Wrote: Where the heck are they going to put everyone?  That's crazy.

Allowing basement apartments, “granny suites” in small backyard and laneway buildings, duplexes, triplexes, and townhouses in “single-family” residential zoning would probably do it. Add in a few large towers here and there and it’s probably no problem to put another couple of million people into the City.

More important is building Transit City.

So much this!  There's plenty of room for 1.3 million more people (there are many cities all over the world even in N/A with far higher density, we only have to allow this to be built), but we DO NOT have room for 1.3 million more cars.
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(10-10-2019, 03:42 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: There's plenty of room for 1.3 million more people …, but we DO NOT have room for 1.3 million more cars.

Great way of framing it!
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(10-08-2019, 11:17 PM)jwilliamson Wrote: $184 million in building permits were issued in the KCW CMA in August, down from $211 million in July.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-qu...3a-eng.htm

Permits were up slightly to $189.8 million in September.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-qu...3b-eng.htm
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Just when you thought things would slow down
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(10-09-2019, 08:55 AM)westwardloo Wrote: Ontario Government released Population Projections for the region up to 2041. Looks like they expect 821,000 people to live in the region by then. Interesting note is that they expect wellington to reach 324,500 people. Presumably most of these numbers are concentrated in the urban areas of Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge and Guelph. So one could assume the the the Combined population of the 4 urban centres would be over 1 million people by 2041! Also Waterloo has already surpassed Hamilton in terms of population and the gap will continue to grow. 

https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/dem...able4.html

Let's put some political perspective on the Hamilton CMA. The population and economy of the Hamilton census area is greatly skewed by the inclusion of Burlington in the Hamilton CMA. "The Bay" connection to Hamilton has changed greatly since the 1970s and no longer flows west to Hamilton. By removing the Burlington population area from the boundary Halton CMA it politically shifted an economically attached population to one that would have a population that is 175K less.

The people and economy of Burlington are not in 2018/19 economically connected to Hamilton, the goods and economy are connected to Halton, Mississauga and Toronto except by politicians who find it expedient to show the Hamilton as a huge populous.   

If the census population of Hamilton was reduced by the 195,000 population of Burlington, both Niagara CMA and Halton CMA would far exceed Hamilton. The inclusion of Hamilton remains a political decision to purport the greater importance of Hamilton.
 
The population from the data in 2018 would show real regions with much different data
"True Halton CMA Region" in 2018 would be  580,000 + 195,000 >   2018 775,000 2046 1,066,000+
"True Niagara CMA" in 2018 remains >  2018 472,000  2046 591,00
"True Hamilton CMA" would be 568,000 - 195,000 >  2018 373,000 2046 574,000

The Census CMA and economy of Hamilton is not what our governments requires us to see.
"I would like to apologize to anyone i have not offended. Please be patient. I will get to you shortly."
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Firstly, the provincial population projections are based on Census Divisions (ie. Counties and Regions) and not CMAs.

Secondly, the delineation of CMAs is not a political decision. Statistics Canada has clearly defined rules for determining CMA boundaries.
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(11-12-2019, 08:31 AM)MacBerry Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 08:55 AM)westwardloo Wrote: Ontario Government released Population Projections for the region up to 2041. Looks like they expect 821,000 people to live in the region by then. Interesting note is that they expect wellington to reach 324,500 people. Presumably most of these numbers are concentrated in the urban areas of Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge and Guelph. So one could assume the the the Combined population of the 4 urban centres would be over 1 million people by 2041! Also Waterloo has already surpassed Hamilton in terms of population and the gap will continue to grow. 

https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/dem...able4.html

Let's put some political perspective on the Hamilton CMA. The population and economy of the Hamilton census area is greatly skewed by the inclusion of Burlington in the Hamilton CMA. "The Bay" connection to Hamilton has changed greatly since the 1970s and no longer flows west to Hamilton. By removing the Burlington population area from the boundary Halton CMA it politically shifted an economically attached population to one that would have a population that is 175K less.

The people and economy of Burlington are not in 2018/19 economically connected to Hamilton, the goods and economy are connected to Halton, Mississauga and Toronto except by politicians who find it expedient to show the Hamilton as a huge populous.   

If the census population of Hamilton was reduced by the 195,000 population of Burlington, both Niagara CMA and Halton CMA would far exceed Hamilton. The inclusion of Hamilton remains a political decision to purport the greater importance of Hamilton.
 
The population from the data in 2018 would show real regions with much different data
"True Halton CMA Region" in 2018 would be  580,000 + 195,000 >   2018 775,000 2046 1,066,000+
"True Niagara CMA" in 2018 remains >  2018 472,000  2046 591,00
"True Hamilton CMA" would be 568,000 - 195,000 >  2018 373,000 2046 574,000

The Census CMA and economy of Hamilton is not what our governments requires us to see.

Your true Hamilton CMA seems to be incorrect: The city itself has 563,000 and the CMA was 747,000 - which include Burlington and Grimsby. At this time, we can't take out Stoney Creek, Dundas, Ancaster, etc., as they are part of The Hammer now.
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(11-12-2019, 07:16 PM)jeffster Wrote:
(11-12-2019, 08:31 AM)MacBerry Wrote: Let's put some political perspective on the Hamilton CMA. The population and economy of the Hamilton census area is greatly skewed by the inclusion of Burlington in the Hamilton CMA. "The Bay" connection to Hamilton has changed greatly since the 1970s and no longer flows west to Hamilton. By removing the Burlington population area from the boundary Halton CMA it politically shifted an economically attached population to one that would have a population that is 175K less.

The people and economy of Burlington are not in 2018/19 economically connected to Hamilton, the goods and economy are connected to Halton, Mississauga and Toronto except by politicians who find it expedient to show the Hamilton as a huge populous.   

If the census population of Hamilton was reduced by the 195,000 population of Burlington, both Niagara CMA and Halton CMA would far exceed Hamilton. The inclusion of Hamilton remains a political decision to purport the greater importance of Hamilton.
 
The population from the data in 2018 would show real regions with much different data
"True Halton CMA Region" in 2018 would be  580,000 + 195,000 >   2018 775,000 2046 1,066,000+
"True Niagara CMA" in 2018 remains >  2018 472,000  2046 591,00
"True Hamilton CMA" would be 568,000 - 195,000 >  2018 373,000 2046 574,000

The Census CMA and economy of Hamilton is not what our governments requires us to see.

Your true Hamilton CMA seems to be incorrect: The city itself has 563,000 and the CMA was 747,000 - which include Burlington and Grimsby.  At this time, we can't take out Stoney Creek, Dundas, Ancaster, etc., as they are part of The Hammer now.

Burlington is only part of The Hammer for political CMA data only. Burlington is part of Halton Region for planning and policy. The population  of Burlington inflates the importance and CMA population of Hamilton and is  therefore imply a paper inclusion. There is no reason to include Burlington in the Hamilton data except it makes the "CMA" seem to be larger and important.

MY point is it is time to change the CMA to reflect a reality that Hamilton is not what the CMA purports to tell. Propping up CMA Hamilton is last century. StatsCan didn't decide the areas, politicians did.  Just change the data to reflect 21stC realities that Hamilton is not what politicians want everyone to believe. CMA fairy tales.
"I would like to apologize to anyone i have not offended. Please be patient. I will get to you shortly."
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